Hitchcock and feminist theory essay

Woman It is very much active male and passive female. Madeline is there to be looked at, the soft focus, the romantic music, the green dress contrasting with the red interior of the restaurant.

Hitchcock and feminist theory essay

The film invites speculation as to which of these paths Jeff and Lisa will follow. They have the kind of uneventful lifestyle that horrifies Jeff.

The Songwriter, a music composer, and Miss Lonelyhearts, a depressed spinster, lead frustrating lives, and at the end of the movie find comfort in each other: There is a subtle hint in this tale that Lisa and Jeff are meant for each other, despite his stubbornness.

In the end, however, it is revealed that she has been waiting for her sweetheart, a slight-framed and boyish soldier, to return. The characters themselves verbally point out a similarity between Lisa and Miss Torso played by Georgine Darcy.

Other analyses, including that of Francois Truffaut in Cahiers du cinema incenter on the relationship between Jeff and the other side of the apartment block, seeing it as a symbolic relationship between spectator and screen.

Film theorist Mary Ann Doane has made the argument[citation needed] hat Jeff, representing the audience, becomes obsessed with the screen, where a collection of storylines are played out. This line of analysis has often followed a feminist approach to interpreting the film.

In the climax, when he is pushed through the window the screenhe has been forced to become part of the show. Rear Window is a voyeuristic film.

Hitchcock and feminist theory essay

Stella invokes the specifically sexual pleasures of looking that is identified as exemplary of classical Hollywood. As a voyeuristic society, we take personal pleasure in watching what is going on around us.Feminist Theory Feminist theory is the extension of feminism into theoretical, or philosophical discourse, it aims to understand the nature of gender inequality.

It examines women's social roles and lived experience, and feminist politics in a variety of fields, such as anthropology and sociology, communication, psychoanalysis, economics. It is very much active male and passive female. Madeline is there to be looked at, the soft focus, the romantic music, the green dress contrasting with the red interior of the restaurant.

Hitchcock and feminist theory essay

The Mis-En-Scene in the restaurant is crying out for Madeline to be an object . Analysis Hitchcock’s fans and film scholars have taken particular interest in the way the relationship between Jeff and Lisa can be compared to the lives of the neighbors they are spying upon.

Rear Window Analysis; Rear Window Analysis. Many of these points are considered in Tania Modleski’s feminist theory book, The Women Who Knew.

book chapter: 'Vertigo' and feminist theory author(s): Susan White appears in: "Alfred Hitchcock: Centenary Essays" - edited by Richard Allen and S. Ishii Gonzales (). The essay examines the work of several prominent scholars of Alfred Hitchcock films and argues that the political ground staked out by queer and feminist critics of these films has become increasingly evacuated by male critics who, while often appropriating the insights of queer and feminist theory.

In an insightful essay appearing in another volume devoted to Hitchcock's work, “Hitchcock and Feminist Theory from Rebecca to Marnie,” Florence Jacobowitz writes, I agreed to write this.

Alfred Hitchcock: A Visual Analysis